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Category : Blog

28 Oct 2018

My time as an MSc Animal Welfare Science, Ethics and Law student at the University of Glasgow by Megan Baker

Last September, I began studying an MSc in Animal Welfare, Science, Ethics and Law at the University of Glasgow. The course is split into three semesters: the first focusing on science research skills, the second ethics and law, with the third dedicated to completing the dissertation or “research project”. Before this I gained my undergraduate degree in law at the University of Birmingham, which is where I became interested in the idea of animal law. During the course of my […]

23 Oct 2018

Donkey Attractions are not Attractive: How Spanish traditions and tourist attractions are causing donkey cruelty by Riley Forson

Ever since I was a little girl, I have always held a special place in my heart for donkeys. This summer I visited El Refugio Del Burrito, and, as always, was humbled by the warmth and affection of the donkeys I saw, especially considering the abject suffering they have been through to find a home with the charity. El Refugio Del Burrito, alongside its UK counter-part, The Donkey Sanctuary, works tirelessly to try to end the cruelty inflicted on donkeys […]

14 Oct 2018

Pepys, Phyla & Philosophy: A History of Animal Welfare Law in the UK (Part One) by Corrina Lewis

This is the first in a series of posts focusing on the history and philosophy of UK animal law, containing a brief overview and looking at some of the people whose ideas have shaped the view of animals that informs our laws today. Throughout history humanity has drawn some fairly arbitrary lines between different animal species when choosing friends, foes, and food. Cats were worshipped in ancient Egypt, dogs have been our companions for thousands of years, yet other species […]

16 Sep 2018

Nature’s Slaves: The Dark Side of Elephant Tourism in Asia by Riley Forson

When we think of elephants we conjure the image of a gentle giant wandering free. For the Asian elephant that would be in its jungle habitat found in India, Thailand and the Malay Peninsula. As a species, many of us share a love, or at least fascination, for elephants. However, our desire to get up close and personal has fuelled a cruel and dark tourism industry, built on our interest and their suffering. The behaviour of Asian elephants Asian elephants […]

23 Jun 2018

Want to study animal law? How will you choose the right masters for you? by Ann Broadhurst

Animal welfare is a very important topic, and the future of it depends on animal laws. For those who wish to study animal law, what options are available and how accessible is the information? Undertaking a masters course is often a key step towards a certain career. There are many factors to consider when choosing the best masters for you. Below are some useful sources which may enhance your search. Useful Sources One valuable source of information is the concise […]

01 Jun 2018

Conservation in the Tsavo National Park, Kenya by Hon. Justice Nzioki Wa Makau

Nzioki Wa Makau sits as a judge at the Industrial Court of Kenya and is Chairman of the Tsavo Trust. He has enjoyed a distinguished career in the Kenyan anti-corruption movement, having previously held positions at the Kenya Anti-Corruption Commission and the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission. It is at the crack of dawn. I woke up about 25 minutes ago, took a very brief shower and dressed in a light t-shirt and some jungle trousers and walked to the sitting […]

01 May 2018

Tennessee Walking Horse Cruelty: By Rachel Smith

Image above: CounterCanter, Flickr Performance equine shows are a regular occurrence in many communities throughout the United States and demonstrate the incredible bond between horse and rider. However, the motivation to achieve the ‘perfect show horse’ can lead to extreme suffering. This blog discusses Tennessee Walking Horses, a breed which has been subjected to severe cruelty in the name of aesthetics. The Tennessee Walking Horse natural gait is a smooth 4 beat gait known as the running walk, with the […]

25 Apr 2018

Greyhounds Lose Out To Greed: by Rachel Smith

Image above: Nancy W Beach As a student of Animal Welfare Science, Ethics and Law, I have closely followed developments in this divisive debate. In Australia, modern greyhound racing began in 1927[1] and there are now 19 tracks across six states, predominately in New South Wales (NSW). Geoff O’Conner, former chief executive of Greyhounds Australia, stated that ‘The Australian Greyhound industry is probably the best-run, the best-regulated and more in touch with animal welfare issues than any other greyhound industry or nation in the […]

15 Apr 2018

Why stricter sentencing for animal cruelty matters more than you think: By Alice Oven

Amidst fears of chlorine chickens and cheap low-welfare imports, a beacon of light for post-Brexit animal welfare has emerged in the form of Gove’s promise to increase the maximum sentence for serious animal cruelty in England. This draft bill, raising maximum jail time from six months to five years, is long overdue, bringing England into line with Northern Ireland, the Irish Republic, Australia and Canada. It’s an obvious cause for celebration for animal advocates and lawyers but, actually, human criminal […]

10 Mar 2018

A call on Parliament for the ban on wild-animal circuses in England: A Personal Perspective by Prabhgat Kaur Sekhon, LPC Graduate

On 20 December 2017, the Scottish Parliament voted to pass the Wild Animals in Travelling Circuses (Scotland) Bill, adding to a growing number of European states who have made it an offence for circus operators to use wild animals in travelling circuses. The Scottish Government introduced the ban, not on the basis of animal welfare, but on ethical grounds “…that this practice is morally objectionable to a large proportion of Scottish society”. Austria, Bolivia, Cyprus and Greece are some of […]